Login

Username

Password



Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.

Website by

Website by
Ecommerce Help

Social Media

  

Shoutbox

You must login to post a message.

26-09-2014 10:16
Doomwatch is the best show around

31-05-2014 09:13
Missed you this week.. Happy Birthday Alex for Sunday. you misunderstood my text last week as I meanth a local broadcast audience. ie Local Bar or suchlike

04-11-2013 00:50
Fantastic first show Alex and great to hear Patrick Henningsen again

03-04-2013 21:37
Good guest this week. When is someone going to knock on the Royals' door???

20-03-2013 21:40
pass the parcel lol

The airplane that hit the Empire State Building in 1945 (2)

On Saturday, July 28, 1945, Lieutenant Colonel William Franklin Smith, Jr. was piloting a B-25 Mitchell bomber on a routine personnel transport mission from Bedford Army Air Field to Newark Airport. Smith asked for clearance to land, but was advised of zero visibility. Proceeding anyway, he became disoriented by the fog, and started turning right instead of left after passing the Chrysler Building.
At 9:40 a.m., the plane crashed into the north side of the Empire State Building, between the 78th and 80th floors, carving an 18 ft (5.5 m) x 20 ft (6.1 m) hole in the building where the offices of the National Catholic Welfare Council were located. One engine shot through the side opposite the impact and flew as far as the next block, landing on the roof of a nearby building and starting a fire that destroyed a penthouse. The other engine and part of the landing gear plummeted down an elevator shaft. The resulting fire was extinguished in 40 minutes. It is still the only fire at such a height that has ever been successfully controlled.
Fourteen people were killed: Smith, the two others aboard the bomber (Staff Sergeant Christopher Domitrovich and Albert Perna, a Navy aviation machinist's mate hitching a ride), and eleven people in the building. Elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver was injured. Rescuers decided to transport her on an elevator which they did not know had weakened cables. She survived a plunge of 75 stories, which still stands as the Guinness World Record for the longest survived elevator fall.
Despite the damage and loss of life, the building was open for business on many floors on the following Monday. The crash helped spur the passage of the long-pending Federal Tort Claims Act of 1946, as well as the insertion of retroactive provisions into the law, allowing people to sue the government for the accident.
Source
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B-25_Empire_State_Building_crash

Comments

No Comments have been Posted.

Post Comment

Please Login to Post a Comment.

Ratings

Rating is available to Members only.

Please login or register to vote.

No Ratings have been Posted.
Render time: 0.04 seconds
436,559 unique visits